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Donald "Scheme" NOBLE

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Donald Scheme Noble

There are many people in the Industry that use the term “Director” very loosely. It takes more than shooting a cheap viral with a Flip cam and throwing it on You tube. I feel the art of symbolism and picture painting is gone in today’s video industry. The Hype Williams and the Benny Booms of yest er year seem to have faded for the you tube trend.


Today’s “Director” doesn’t even know what a treatment is let alone how to create one.


I was able to sit down with a Visionary that embodies the passion and dedication that Directors before him had. His name is Donald Noble and better known by his peers as million dollar scheme or scheme Spielberg.


Noble has crafted his own lane in his cluttered video industry, In less than 3 years Noble has Directed over 20 music videos, edited videos for ciroc, Fabolous and Fubu, and is currently in the works of finishing up his 6th short film. Noble took time out of his hectic schedule to share his vision and plans for the future.


N54: How Did You get the nicknames million dollar scheme and scheme Spielberg? Got both names from clients. I usually incorporate movie treatments whenever I can in my projects and shoot it in filmgrade 17mm 85mm.


N54: I see you been getting your Tyler perry on. you directing, Producing, and editing all your stuff. Does that get hectic? Yeah man, you already know. Easiest way to explain it is rolling credits. At the end of the movie, outside of the actors and actresses, if you were to play it in slo-mo, you’d see the amount of people/functions it takes to put a decent video project together, keeping in mind these professionals are experts in their field. When you’re on a shoe-string budget you don’t have that luxury, you gotta try to wear as much hats as possible to see the project through to the end. The advantage though is a crash course and immediate insight into the challenges of the professionals I’ll be working with in the future


N54: How are your treatments made. do you create a specific treatment tailored for that specific artist or brand? Of course, you have to tailor the treatment. Audio is the most important component in video production is because the mood of any particular video project is carried and initiated in it’s sound waves. Hence, my philosophy is video follows sound, with an additional layer of sound over the completed video to tie the initial audio and video composition together. So if audio compositions are like finger prints, no 2 are exactly alike, same should be true of video treatments.


N54: How have you been able to make such a Big impact in the game in such a short amount of time? Well, I’ll always be the first to tell you that I have a looooong way to go (pause), but I believe the key to my growth thus far is observation and networking. Meet new people outside your immediate circle or even your profession and study how they approach meeting the requirements for success in their own lives everyday. If we take the time each day to measure ourselves against greatness it will always yield some form of growth when you apply what you’ve learned. A famous architect once said ‘God is in the details’, he was right... all the way down to it’s atomic composition. Hahaha, but that’s too deep, for now I’ll just leave it at that.


N54: Do you have formal education in film production or is everything self taught? Self taught, hats off to everyone who could afford that because formal education usually accelerates the learning curve in any field. It doesn’t replace natural born talent but it certainly helps. I believe in the end though, the better photographer is usually the one that takes the most pics and video is still photography by other means.


N54: I understand you do photography as well. how is that transition been? Photography is pure art. It’s an efficient comparison to painting. In painting you have more control of expressing time in the individual components of the composition through shading, color selection, brush strokes, etc. But the art of photography is to capture the individual components (background, subject, lighting, shadows, etc) synced at that perfect millisecond using the right shutter speed, correct lens millimeter aspect ratio and optimal focal length. Way more complex than recording motion in my opinion. When the principles of photography are applied to video it greatly increases the impact of the rendered video.


N54: How did you get your start in the business? A plan, hard work, a string of failures and networking.


N54: What was the best advice you have received since you been in the game? Can’t say what the best advice was, I try to incorporate and take in as much constructive advise and criticism as I can get from everyone who takes the time to respond to a project I’ve put out there. However, my best advise to any upcoming film producers ad/or directors is : See it before you shoot it. Literally and figuratively examine your subject, background and location in as much detail possible before saying ‘action’.


N54: Who was your favorite artist or project to shoot? That’s a tough one. Every artist on every project yields a different egg, so it’s hard to lock in a favorite. Honestly I think my favorite project has yet to come. I suppose it’ll be the one that most incorporates everything I’ve learned and best compels people to change their decision making for the better.


N54: Who are some Directors that you look up to? Hahahaha, Spielberg. George Lucas , Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, and James Cameron.


N54: What projects are you currently working on? Right now, any and everything. Short films, music videos, commercial ads, documentaries and marketing campaigns for clothing lines. Building a diversied production portfolio


N54: When its all said and done. how do you want your work to be remembered? Hmmm. I guess like all other great works, dynamic in and for it’s time.


N54: How can people contact you if they need a project shot? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., Facebook/Scheme.Spieberg